'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Edinburgh Festival

Review: The James Plays

The stories that a nation tells to itself begin with gods and kings and heroes. As James I says, ‘I am Scotland’. And if we live in a time of no gods and precious few heroes, perhaps that’s exactly the time to start finding out where we came from. Hence the need for, and grand occasion of, the James Plays. (Read More)

Photograph: Pexels
Edinburgh Festival

Politics, Distraction and the Digital Inferno

Every year for the past eight years I’ve spent August at the Edinburgh Fringe, seeing shows and writing a few reviews. As founder and editor of FringeReview I have had the opportunity to observe at first hand the changing nature of marketing at the Fringe. Edinburgh’s famous Royal Mile is still packed each day with thousands of hopeful artists handing out paper leaflets – the famous ‘flyers’ – in the hope of gaining an audience for their production.

In parallel, the rise of social media has led to Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, Pinterest boards, Linkedin groups to name but the most famous (or infamous) ones. (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

Review: Bill Clinton: Hercules

‘Come and meet the 42nd President as he cuts loose and shoots straight from the hip in his own fantasy TED talk! From the Trojan Wars to the future of democracy, his dreams, regrets, hopes and passions, Occupy, Hillary and Monica… Beloved stained icon and reviled Slick Willy. A life epic in its own right, but what will be Bubba’s final act? Can the Comeback Kid come back? Kansas City’s Bob Paisley is directed by Fringe legend and Olivier winner Guy Masterson (Morecambe, Animal Farm, Scaramouche Jones, 12 Angry Men) in the ultimate tell-all by Rachel Mariner.’ (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

Review: Bloom

‘Two men shelter in a soup kitchen on a bitter Scottish evening. As the darkness looms, they face up to a past they cannot escape. In this gripping new work, Glasgow based Vocal Point (Splintered, The Brains of the Family) present powerful true stories uncovered through conversations with regulars at the Glasgow City Mission soup kitchen. Using technologies in its visual storytelling, Bloom reinstates the tales of two fascinating individuals and their plight.’ (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

Review: Naked in Alaska

A remarkable solo drama charting the story of a 21-year-old, now sober, evicted young woman who embarks on a career in the pole-dancing business, from Tijuana to Alaska. From the dizzying highs to the devastating lows (and back again), Valerie Hager gives a candid exploration of the empowerment her profession brings and impact it has on the relationships in her life. (Read More)