Brexit

Now Is The Time To Codify A Constitution For Britain

“Brexit’s is perhaps the most divisive issue ever to befall British politics. Everyone has their own take on the advantages, or pitfalls, of this leap into political uncertainty. It necessitates that Britain re-write its relationship with the European Union, requiring parliament to legislate on areas of policy that once came under the EU’s purview” (Read More)

Brexit

Votes for Life must only be the beginning

“While the passing of the Bill will likely meet the government’s pledge of legislating on the issue before the 2022 general election, it will most likely not be in place before Brexit on March 29, 2019. On the off chance there was to be another referendum on any final deal, the most populous territories of expats – 308,000 British citizens in Spain, 254,000 in Ireland and 185,000 in France – would again be denied a say on their future.” (Read More)

Brexit

Passports are a hint of things to come

“Campaigns have now emerged to have the passports made in Britain. Made in Britain. The ludicrousness of that statement couldn’t be clearer. For decades, centuries even, Britain has done more to shape the modern trading world than perhaps any other country bar America. To be so parochial now, to place nationalism over practical necessity, is a cop-out.” (Read More)

Brexit

Brexit makes me angry, and you should be too

“Now – this is where the slightly irked, mostly p*ssed perspective comes into play. My fiancé could have been from any one of the 27 other countries in the EU, and the situation would be the same. This doubt, this fear, is happening to hundreds of thousands of families. Those British and EU citizens who migrated exercised their democratic freedom of movement at a time when the prospect of an EU referendum, never mind Brexit, was not even a talking point.” (Read More)

Brexit

Why it’s time for overseas MPs

“Yet Brexit has ably demonstrated that unless one renounces their British citizenship, the motherland is always over the shoulder. Political decisions taken by Her Majesty’s Government can have real and lasting consequences on the five million people who make up the British diaspora, and there’s little they can do about it beyond writing to and contacting their local Member of Parliament.” (Read More)

Photograph: 'The pro-EU march from Hyde Park to Westminster in London on March 25, 2017, to mark 60 years since the EU's founding agreement, the Treaty of Rome' by Ilovetheeu / CC
Brexit

Is May safeguarding the position of EU and UK citizens?

“At face value, it appears to be a good deal. However, when one reads the small print, it becomes apparent that there is no value in the offer, and it lacks the certainty that Theresa May continuously refers to. The offer has come after the EU Council Decision of 22 May proposing their policy on safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU. Therefore both sides have now adopted their position. However, the UK’s offer is nowhere close to what EU would like to secure as a part of the exit deal.” (Read More)

Photograph: 'First Minister Nicola Sturgeon' / Ninian Reid
Brexit

Why Scotland is good for Brexit

“Even if one acknowledges that Scotland voted ‘No’ to independence in 2014, and even if it’s conceded therefore that Scotland is a collection of constituencies and not an individual nation in UK general elections, it is impossible to deny that the reality of Brexit will affect every devolved sphere of Scottish society.” (Read More)

Photograph: 'European Communities Act 1972' / Legislation.go.uk
Brexit

A snapshot of Brexit legalese

‘What is clear, however, is that like a patient who has voted to get better, it’s lunacy, improper and downright unprofessional to deny the consultation of, prognosis by and treatment from professional doctors who have decades of experience. Why would the Government want to deny the expertise, opinion and voice of 650 full-time MPs elected to represent the very people whose will they now want to implement?’ (Read More)

Photograph: Pexels
Brexit

Time to reboot the debate on Europe

Last week the first of a series of debates on the UK’s membership of the European Union took place in Glasgow. This debate were to focus on the concerns of young people, but it maybe didn’t get off to a wondrous start. The panel, with its mean age of almost 60, is maybe not the best to really understand the concerns of today’s youth. The debate itself very aptly summed up the referendum debate so far – scaremongering, with little regard for facts as the dominant narrative. This is doing nothing to rebuild the public’s trust in politicians, especially as both sides contradict the other sides’ arguments on a continuing basis. With less than a month to go, it is time for a reboot of the debate on Europe. (Read More)

'Europe' / CC
Brexit

The EU referendum and the upward march of history

I do not consider this to be absurdly speculative. History is made by iron rings clanging together to forge a chain that takes us from A to B across time. It is not just a series of events but a series of decisions about what we hope comes next. Staying inside the EU, reforming it from within, is a logical course to achieve what some might call world peace. The perennial reality of Realism is only perennial so far because no valued alternative has been posited. We have a chance to change that beginning now – the EU has the scale, the power and the means to achieve meaningful peace and prosperity and we should embrace this and let it grow. (Read More)

'Europe' / CC
Brexit

Do you know how the EU works?

Democracy in all its forms is delightful. One flick through the news channels is enough to see that millions are still denied the right to vote because of strife, repression or fear. But democracy relies on the electorate making as informed a choice as possible. If knowledge is power, then I worry that all political parties have missed a beat with Europe.

(Read More)