global citizenship
Environment & Energy

The future challenge of climate change refugees

Are we currently fully aware of and prepared for the issues that could arise over the next decade due to climate change? It could be argued that there is a lack of awareness of the impacts of climate change in remote subsistence communities around the world and also a lack of preparedness within global policy that needs to be addressed in order to mitigate the issues that could arise through a climate change influenced refugee crisis in the coming years.

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Shanti Stupa Prayer Flags
Environment & Energy

Climate change and farming in the Indian Himalayas – Photo Essay

As the issue of climate change has increasingly severe impacts around the world, many communities will be adversely effected. Perhaps on of the most severely effected will be remote subsistence communities that rely on glacial melt water for irrigation. Many of these communities can be found in Ladakh: a high altitude desert region nestled in the center of the Indian Himalayas. (Read More)

'Lighting the Future' / CC
Environment & Energy

The bright future of nuclear power

With moderated, slowed down neutrons, only a fraction of the nuclei in the core can be fissioned. With unmoderated, or fast neutrons, a considerably higher proportion of the nuclei are fissionable. This leads to favourable recycling properties which present a solution to the single biggest issue concerning commercial nuclear power – waste. (Read More)

Environment & Energy

Watch | John Lindberg – The securitisation of nuclear power

Why is it that nuclear power is so feared, despite the fact science rejects this notion? What are the implications of this in terms of combating climate change? In his talk at the undergraduate conference ‘Let’s Talk About X’ at the University of Glasgow, Darrow’s Deputy Editor John Lindberg explores some of these questions by using the theory of securitisation. (Read More)

Environment & Energy

Democracy and environmental vision can go together

What’s to be done? Saying ‘go vote’ is wasted breath because people will only want to do it if they want to anyway. What we should all be rallying for, particularly at elections, is not just for promises for this and that but for, as President George H.W Bush put it, the ‘vision thing’. We want politicians that will sacrifice the popular for the right, and there is a curious absence of it these days. Our country deserves more than ‘the now’ and it deserves a future, but only if our elected officials are brave enough to look beyond their own five-year plans and see the nation’s life as contingent on the environment which nourishes its peoples. (Read More)

Environment & Energy

COP21 in review: A scientific viewpoint

These are three of the main components of the Paris deal so why is the language quite so vague? Most likely it is because producing clear legislation that, in some cases is legally binding, for dates that are often decades into the future is extremely difficult. (Read More)

Environment & Energy

Conservation and Global Citizenship: Volcanic Hazards in Tanzania

In the summer of 2015 I was part of a geological expedition team who travelled to Northwest Tanzania to study the unique and unusual lavas of the Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano. As the sole geographer on the team, I conducted several interviews with members of the local Maasai community. Through hearing about their lifestyle, I soon realised that we need to move beyond the blanket term of conservation to consider the wider interconnections of the people, wildlife and landscapes we are trying to protect. (Read More)

Environment & Energy

The IPCC: A credit to science, but failing individuals

For many the United Nations (UN) climate change conference in Paris at the end of November this year is a make or break moment for anthropogenic, or human-induced climate change. Negotiations over a law-binding international treaty committing governments to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions have been taking place for over two decades now. The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has also been in existence for over twenty years now and given the lack of international progress regarding climate over that period, is the IPCC functioning effectively given the severity of the matter at hand? To assess this one needs to consider the history of the IPCC, and the methods it has adopted to convey its findings. (Read More)

Environment & Energy

Climate change terrorism: A threat in the future?

When the history of the early 21st century is written it will likely tell of a single day as the fateful turning point. 9/11 will be recorded as the point when the ‘war on terror’ was launched in earnest, unleashing untold havoc across the world. With its vacuously intoxicating allure the war on terror has torn resources from other pressing issues globally and for the last 15 years the ‘war on terror’ has absorbed so much of our attention that little else has managed to squeeze itself on to the agenda. Military budgets have ballooned and the bombing of foreign countries has become common practice in disregard to international law. (Read More)

Environment & Energy

The evil twin of climate change

2015 could be the year that mankind united and rises above national grievances and takes action against a threat that we all face. Climate change is upon us and our actions have already led to significant and irreversible changes to our planet. The climate summit in Paris in December will be the last chance to seriously address the problem – inaction now and we will not be able to meet the critical 2 degree target. If the planet heats more than 2 degrees we are in unchartered waters, waters that will very dangerous for all species on this Earth, not only humans. (Read More)

'Lighting the Future' / CC
Environment & Energy

A small solution to a big problem

What if we could address Britain and Scotland’s energy security before it became a real problem, with a solution that not only offers cheap and reliable electricity, but also allows for us to meet our emission targets? Renewable energy sources are important yet usually fail two out of three tests all while the hypocrisy of the SNP remains astounding. (Read More)

'Lighting the Future' / CC
Environment & Energy

Nuclear Britannia – How a break with complacency can save the day

Many of the greatest revolutions that mankind has experienced have been linked to the innovation or exploration of new energy sources. Coal allowed us to leave the Dark Ages behind and step into the Industrial Revolution. The automobile revolution, driven by oil, continued that revolution. But we are now standing on the brink of a new step, a new revolution. The question is, will we dare to seize the moment? (Read More)