Film & TV

Review | ‘Dunkirk’

“There are several leading characters in the film but there is nobody around which the entire story revolves. Not even Kenneth Branagh’s Commander who stands on the pier attempting to direct the evacuation is master of his own fate. All rely on the other interlinking perspectives of the story. The perspective of Mark Rylance’s retired veteran’s pleasure boat crossing the channel to a war zone is fuelled by the duty to do his bit.  As is Tom Hardy’s endless dogfights in the air knowing he might lack the fuel to get himself home.” (Read More)

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Arts & Culture

Thoughts on Daniel Craig quitting as James Bond

Like all good things, it was not meant to be. Daniel Craig quitting also means that Waltz is unlikely to return, previously saying he only do so if it was opposite Craig. The future is, for the first time in ten years, wide open as to what turn the franchise will take next and at this stage it is anyone’s guess as to what direction, and what Bond, they studio will select. (Read More)

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Film & TV

Review: The Salvation

With his wonderfully restrained style of acting, Mads Mikkelson stars in The Salvation, a western that incorporates all the traditions of old-school westerns while giving the genre a wonderful boost of vitality. (Read More)

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Film & TV

Review: The Martian

Based on Andy Weir’s 2011 novel, The Martian tells the story of Mark Watney (Matt Damon), a botanist on a manned mission to Mars who, through a freak accident, is presumed dead and left behind by the rest of his crew as they escape a storm on the planet’s surface. Watney, alive and well, is now marooned on Mars without enough food to last him until the next manned mission from Earth arrives. He must put all of his training and knowledge into action in order to survive and make contact with Earth while at the same time NASA scientists and Watney’s crew try to figure out a way to bring the stranded astronaut home. (Read More)

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Film & TV

Review: Legend

Brian Helgeland’s Legend seems like an almost tailor-made vehicle for its star Tom Hardy. The films hook, of Hardy playing both male leads, allows him to display his immense talent for portraying both subtle, nuanced, dark characters and wild, over-the-top eccentrics at the same time. Hardy has, for a while now, been one of the best actors to come out of Britain but Legend really showcases his talents perfectly. (Read More)

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Film & TV

Review: Solace

Originally intended to be a sequel to 1995 film Se7en, Solace is a typical FBI-hunts-serial killer with a psychic twist plot. Haruki Murakami fans, such as myself, will be surprised to learn that the killers method of choice is a sharp implement directly into the base of the neck. For a moment I confused my fictions and thought Aomame from 1Q84 was the murderer. It turns out she is not in this case. (Read More)

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Arts & Culture

Review: ‘Die Welle’ (The Wave)

Is the threat of dictatorship and oppression but a distant memory? Is it something only found in developing countries half a world away? Has democracy and its subliminal values been entrenched in the West? These are all issues that Dennis Gansel’s film Die Welle (The Wave in English) seeks to deal with. Based on true events, this story seeks to explore the human psyche and the very society that we are taking for granted when it is put under pressure and its ‘basic truths’ are questioned. (Read More)

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Film & TV

Review: Wolf Hall

Because most of us live through television, sometimes it seems that the Second World War never ended and that the Tudors still reign. Of course, the appeal of both is that they’re damn’ good stories, capable of sustaining and surviving endless reinvention. Whether they will eventually become mythical, like Robin Hood and King Arthur and Clause IV, remains to be seen. However good the current incarnations may be, you know there will be others. (Read More)