'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

Fall @ [email protected] Infirmary Street

Edinburgh Fringe Festival is never short of Shakespeare adaptations however finding one as captivating and inventive as Fall is rare. Written by Katie Dunstan and Alex Doble, and directed by Jamie Woods, Entita Theatre present a physical theatre production closely based on Macbeth that makes you forget it is based on Shakespeare at all which is highly impressive, especially given how young the cast are. (Read More)

Photograph: Pexels
Film & TV

Review: The Salvation

With his wonderfully restrained style of acting, Mads Mikkelson stars in The Salvation, a western that incorporates all the traditions of old-school westerns while giving the genre a wonderful boost of vitality. (Read More)

Theatre

Review: Dylan Moran ‘Off The Hook’

Dylan Moran brings his unique brand of optimistic pessimism to Glasgow’s Clyde auditorium for a night of serious laughter, and an impressive array of artwork, with Off The Hook. Everyone’s favourite hater of things returns to rail against politics, technology, golf, religion and the current trend of British Bake Off and Strictly Come Dancing TV programmes. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

Cut @ Underbelly, George Square

Site specific show Cut brings something a little bit different to Edinburgh Fringe this year, taken into an airplane style set-up the air hostess gives instructions and provides a safe-word for those who may need to leave creating a foreboding atmosphere before plunging the room into absolute darkness. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

Review: Clown Macbeth @ C

While it is not difficult to find an incarnation of a Shakespeare classic at Edinburgh Fringe Festival, it is often difficult to find a new way of performing it. Using mime, dance, music, and sound, Clown Macbeth by Ryukyu Cirque have certainly achieved this. (Read More)

Arts & Culture

Limbo @ Underbelly Circus Hub

The circus comes to town in spectacular fashion with Limbo at the new Underbelly Circus Hub. Bringing danger and darkness to the Fringe Limbo serves up a wide selection of acts including live music, dance acts, fire eating, sword swallowing, and contortion. (Read More)

'Our fiction writing' / CC
Books

Book Trailers: Friend or Foe?

I am in turmoil over the recent popularity of book trailers, I despise the use of technology where literature is concerned. I was forced to get a Kindle to allow authors to send me their books for me to review as that is the route most authors prefer. But reading on a device is not the same as holding a book in your hand, the feel, smell, and intimacy can not transcend to an e-reader. I understand it has made literature more widely available to the masses which is not a bad thing however I can only hope they in no way serve to eradicate actual books. I will never understand anyone preferring a kindle to an actual book, it is beyond my comprehension. (Read More)

'Books are power' / CC
Books

Review: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami

Those familiar with Haruki Murakami will know of the fantasy elements that run through most of his books; parallel universes, taking cats, and mysterious wells being just a few. Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage is a break away from that. Like his 1987 novel Norwegian Wood, this focuses purely on the people and the relationships between them. Being an ardent admirer of Murakami I spent the whole novel seeing foreboding where there wasn’t any and seeing potential supernatural within the story. This did not lead to disappointment however. As always the writing holds such a magical quality to it that attention is captivated without the need for magic in the plot. (Read More)

Photograph: Pexels
Film & TV

Review: Solace

Originally intended to be a sequel to 1995 film Se7en, Solace is a typical FBI-hunts-serial killer with a psychic twist plot. Haruki Murakami fans, such as myself, will be surprised to learn that the killers method of choice is a sharp implement directly into the base of the neck. For a moment I confused my fictions and thought Aomame from 1Q84 was the murderer. It turns out she is not in this case. (Read More)

'Our fiction writing' / CC
Books

Review: The First Bad Man: A Novel by Miranda July

Cheryl Glickman is not a typical protagonist; middle aged, not a conventional beauty, neurotic, and extremely weird. Cheryl Glickman is a human being. A refreshing change compared to a lot of women within fiction. Her quirkiness is endearing and almost overwhelming as her personality slaps you in the face from every page. Her main concern to begin with is being a strong career woman and capturing the attentions of colleague Phillip. this all begins to fall apart, however, when another colleagues daughter becomes her supposedly temporary room-mate. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Edinburgh Festival

The Glenn Miller Story @ The Kings Theatre Glasgow

Directed by Bob Tomson and Bill Kenwright The Glenn Miller Story swings into Glasgow bringing back an era that is often much forgotten. The legendary british entertainer Tommy Steele brings his uniqueness to the role of composer, arranger, musician, and band-leader Glenn Miller, aiding a wonderfully old-fashioned stye of entertainment. (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Books

Johann Hari @ Edinburgh International Book Festival 2015

Drugs policy is a controversial topic and may not seem like an interesting topic to use for a book however Johann Hari has done just that. Chasing the Scream uses human tales to advocate the legalization of drugs. Hari has travelled to many countries to speak with many people on their experiences of personal drug abuse or those associated with it. (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

The Cherry Orchard: Beyond the Truth @ C Nova

Directed by Park YeonJoo The Cherry Orchard: Beyond the truth is based on the Chekhov classic though this performance focuses on three of the original list of characters. This physical theatre performance is highly inventive, conveying a lot within the intense physicality in a much more interesting way that dialogue ever could. The dialogue that is used flits between english and korean however it is not necessary to understand both languages to understand the piece. This bilingual aspect brings an added cultural flavour which is important for international companies to retain. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy: The Deliverance @ Assembly Roxy

Stellar Quines Theatre Company present The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy as part of Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Each show can be viewed as stand alone pieces but they are interlinked to create a powerful trilogy. Written by Jennifer Tremblay, translated by Stellar Quines, and performed by Maureen Beattie The Deliverance follows the woman trying to fulfill her mothers dying wish of seeing her son one last time. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

Perceptual Landscape @ [email protected] Square

Comuna De Pedra present a physical theatre piece that explores the meaning of reality and illusion. Inspired by children with autism, Perceptual Landscapes uses light and sound to great effect creating a rich sensory experience and pushing the boundaries on how light and sound can be used within a performance. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

Fiction @ Pleasance Dome

Fiction is a brilliantly unique theatre experience. After a disjointed start of seemingly random scenes on the screen the audience, each wearing their headphones, are plunged into absolute darkness and stay that way for the duration. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy: The Carousel @ Assembly Roxy

Stellar Quines Theatre Company present The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy as part of Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Each show can be viewed as stand alone pieces but they are interlinked to create a powerful trilogy. Written by Jennifer Tremblay, translated by Stellar Quines, and performed by Maureen Beattie the second installment of the trilogy, The Carousel, follows a woman as she travels across the Canadian landscape to her dying mother’s bedside and through a series of memories as she attempts to better understand her family and herself. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Arts & Culture

The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy: The List @ Assembly Roxy

Stella Quines Theatre Company present The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy as part of Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Each show can be viewed as stand alone pieces but they are interlinked to create a powerful trilogy. Written by Jennifer Tremblay, translated by Stellar Quines, and performed by Maureen Beattie The List examines themes of family, loss, and regret. (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

The Girl Who Fell in Love with the Moon @ Pleasance Dome

The Girl Who Fell in Love with the Moon is physical theatre with a lot of heart using live music, dance, movement, and a little bit of puppetry. Stranded at night in the woods a group of performers perform their show to the ‘non existent audience’. This show is comprised of shorter shows which all follow a celestial pattern written by Luna, the leader of their troop, played by artistic director Florence O’ Mahony (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

Review: What Would Spock Do? @ Gilded Balloon

This is a show for every geek out there who has ever felt ashamed, embarrassed or isolated within their love of a fandom. Especially Star Trek. Sam Donnelly takes us through his intense love of Star Trek and the bullying he endured because of it, tales of his grandfather’s role in his obsession and his decision to suppress it, through to the love story between him and the girl who has her very own Spock Day. (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

Review: The Lonely Poet @ Sweet Grassmarket

There are two types of experiences to be had during this performance, one is to view it as an audience member and the other is to be selected to have the entire piece performed to you as if they were the only one there. Both have their perks, and possibly their drawbacks. This is definitely unique in my experience, because it raises the question if you can really break the fourth wall if only for one audience member. Perhaps Tim Honnef has just created a hole in the wall instead. (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Arts & Culture

Review: Bat-Fan @ Pleasance Courtyard

If you love Batman you will love this show. Using songs, musical parodies, and some slightly glitchy graphics to accompany his Bat-lecture James Wilson Taylor has created an outlet for his enthusiasm and frustrations surrounding this popular franchise. (Read More)

Moyan Brenn, Edinburgh Festival / CC
Books

Evie Wyld and Joe Sumner @ Edinburgh Book Festival

As part of Edinburgh International Book Festival 2015 Joe Gordon chairs the discussion with author Evie Wyld and illustrator Joe Sumner. Together Wyld and Sumner have created the graphic novel ‘Everything is Teeth’ which is a memoir of Evie’s childhood growing up in Australia and her fixation and fear of sharks. This project began as a short story by Wyld and has taken 6-7 years of collaboration to become what it is today. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Theatre

Review: Fever Dream: Southside

Fever Dream: Southside is vivid, imaginative, and well staged. It is also packed with stereotypes and cliches, and does not give the broad representation of the Southside of Glasgow that is expected. Each character is an – often offensive – stereotype, from the smart asian boy to the quirky, attention seeking performance artist, with not much room for any development. The racism wrapped in humour is unnecessary and creates an obviously white, middle class production which is a shame given the setting of the piece. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Theatre

Review: Woman In Black

Still touring after 25 years The Woman In Black, adapted from the novel by Susan Hill, is a ghost story with sharp shocks and eerie shadows. The show within a show follows Arthur Kipps, the writer of a story he is desperate to tell, and an actor who helps him tell it as they rehearse in an empty theatre. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Theatre

Review: The Straw Chair

The Straw Chair is based upon the story of a true historical figure of Lady Rachel Grange and her banishment to a secluded island by her husband after their divorce. Lady Grange was ahead of her time and did not act as women were told they should in the 18th century. For this she was left upon an island that drove her half mad with it’s isolation and total contrast to the Edinburgh life she had known. (Read More)

'Theatre', Jeffrey Smith / CC
Theatre

Review: Lippy

As part of Behaviour Festival, Dead Centre bring ‘Lippy’ to Citizens Theatre. Based upon the true events of four women who seemingly starved themselves to death in County Kildare, Lippy is a confusion of elements lacking any sort of main point that would pull the performance together to create something meaningful. In trying to say so much it fails to say very much at all. (Read More)