Donald Trump and Theresa May’s ‘special relationship’ has been turned into NSFW street art

Photograph: 'Alcester Road, Moseley - graffiti street art - USA 1776-2016' / Elliott Brown

Katy Perry seems an unlikely choice to spearhead satire. Nevertheless, her parody of Donald Trump and Theresa May at the 2017 Brit Awards was expert trolling: Dancing skeletons of the two leaders summed up the feelings of an entire generation that isn’t content to have their future snapped away.

And it didn’t stop there. There’s a silent protest ripping apart the pretentiousness of leaders and their disconnect from the electorate. Street art is now the mocking pointing finger. Across the country, murals are popping up which are, most of the time, NSFW. And why should they be? Protests should not be pretty, and artistic expression across history has always contained frustration and motive in the solid paint markers on street walls.

Donald Trump is a bloated muse of comedy. He exists as a mirror for comedians to see the monster they’ve created with decades of lampooning grey politicians. He is a decidedly reactionary beast and the same applies to May: her sanguine commitment to Brexit has created a pantomime villain of false modesty. Forever and always have people pined for decisiveness and are now left with precisely that with little room for discourse. Be careful what you wish for is the lesson.

That street art across the country and the world is taking aim on such an absurd situation is not surprising. It’s less surprising still that much of it contains sexual innuendo as to the nature of their relationship; just how ‘special’ it is and who has the power.

May’s relationship with Trump and her urgent need to make Britain ‘global’ (whatever that means) necessitates getting into bed with someone who not only openly despises women but is just as equally a protectionist. The irony, the deceptions, the empty smiles are ripe for parody: are our leaders unaware of the hypocrisy, or are they too stupid to realise the inherent contradictions in their agenda?

Young people have never even more isolated, and some are lashing out. Street art represents an immutable reaction against a political class that doesn’t want to listen, a voting system that is flawed and a society that feels angrier than ever in a generation.  It is no coincidence that these montages are so often graphic in their depiction and so publicly displayed.

There is one question that overrides all others. Who is worse: the fool, or the fool that follows?

Theresa May’s obsession with Brexit disguises a mind that was probably never as pro-Remain as she thought she was. Trump’s racist rhetoric toward Muslims is as absurd as it is unfounded.

Street art, like all great protests, is a voice for the people and it should continue to be innovative, crass and loud.

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Alastair Stewart 81 Articles

Alastair Stewart is a freelance writer and journalist based in Edinburgh and Almería. He currently works as a journalist for The Sol Times and regularly writes about politics, history and culture for magazines across Europe.


He was formerly a press officer at the Scottish Parliament. He graduated from Edinburgh University with an MA in International Relations.

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